Former military intel chief Raja Rashid dies

Former military intel chief Raja Rashid dies

Former military intel chief Raja Rashid dies

KUALA LUMPUR: Former military intelligence chief Lieutenant-General (Rtd) Datuk Raja Abdul Rashid Raja Badiozaman died from an illness, today. He was 82.

Armed Forces Defence Intelligence Staff Division (DISD) director-general Lieutenant-General Datuk Ahmad Norihan Jalal said Raja Rashid died at 12.30am after being admitted to Ampang Hospital on July 15.

He said the deceased’s remains were first taken to his Taman Bukit Ampang home and then for prayers at Masjid Khalid Al Walid at the Defence Ministry in Jalan Padang Tembak.





He was later buried at the Raudhatul Sakinah Muslim cemetery at the Sungai Besi army camp.

“Raja Rashid earned high regard from officers and men from local and foreign military and police organisations.

“He was acclaimed as the dean of the intelligence community during his service and was a very good strategist and a master in counter intelligence,” said Norihan, adding that Raja Rashid had served seven years as the 10th DISD director-general before retiring in 1995.

 


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Raja Rashid leaves behind wife Datin Wan Zaitun Mohammad Amin, 80, four sons — Raja Radzuan, Raja Iskandar, Raja Azhar and Raja Asfar — and two daughters, Raja Rosmin and Raja Aishah.





A Defence Ministry official said Raja Rashid was the younger brother of the late Raja Tun Mohar Raja Badiozaman, who was a former Treasury secretary-general and chairman of Malaysia Airlines and Perodua.

He was also the great-grandson of Sultan Abdullah Muhammad Shah II, the 26th Sultan of Perak.

“Raja Rashid received his early secondary education at Clifford School, Kuala Kangsar, before being admitted to the Federation Military College (FMC) in Port Dickson, Negri Sembilan.

“He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the army in 1962, and went on to serve for 34 years.

“He later graduated from Lancaster University, the United Kingdom, with a master’s in international relations and strategic studies,” said the official.





Raja Rashid is from FMC’s Intake 5 in 1961, that included prominent officers like former Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) chief Vice Admiral (Rtd) Tan Sri Mohd Sharif Ishak, former RMN deputy chief Vice Admiral (Rtd) Datuk Haron Mohd Salleh, ex-RMN deputy chief Rear Admiral (Rtd) Datuk Yaacob Daud, First Admiral (Rtd) Datuk Nicholas Peterson and former Royal Malaysian Air Force inspector-general Brigadier-General (Rtd) Datuk Soon Lian Cheng.

 


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His batch also included three pioneer army officers from the Brunei Armed Forces — Awang Sulaiman Awang Damit, Awang Mohammad Daud and Awangku Ibnu Pengiran Apong.

Awangku Ibnu, who was bestowed the title Pengiran Sanggamara Diraja, retired as Brunei’s deputy defence minister (September 1986 to May 2005), holding the rank of major-general.

Pehin Orang Kaya Seri Dewa Major-General (Rtd) Datuk Seri Pahlawan Awang Mohammad and the late Pehin Datu Indera Setia Major-General (Rtd) Datuk Paduka Seri Awang Sulaiman became Brunei’s first and second Royal Armed Forces chiefs, in 1986 and 1990 respectively.





“Among the key posts Raja Rashid held was commanding officer of the 8th Battalion (Para) Royal Ranger Regiment, an airborne infantry battalion that fought against the communist insurgents.

“After retirement, he occasionally wrote on security issues for the media and had given lectures at the Malaysian Police College and the International Islamic University Malaysia,” the official said.

Post-retirement, Raja Rashid served as chairman of Ayer Molek Rubber Company Bhd, Desaru Development Corporation Sdn Bhd; executive chairman of trading company MOCOM Corporation Sdn Bhd and power line communications firm Realm Energy Sdn Bhd.

He was also a director with Lam Soon Sdn Bhd.

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Former military intel chief Raja Rashid dies


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Ayam Punya Hal Kecoh Satu Negara

 

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